Stages of Grief

Are there stages of grief?

In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up.

The five stages of grief:

  • Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.”
  • Anger:Why is this happening? Who is to blame?”
  • Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.”
  • Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.”
  • Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.”

If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages – and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in.

Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.”

Grief can be a roller coaster

Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief.

Source: Hospice Foundation of America

The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief – Psych Central
http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/the-5-stages-of-loss-and-grief/
Many of us are not afforded the luxury of time required to achieve this final stage of grief. In our bereavement, we spend different lengths of time working through each step and express each stage more or less intensely. Throughout each stage, a common thread of hope emerges.

five stages of grieffive stages of grief
http://peoplemotion.wordpress.com/tag/five-stages-of-grief/

 

 

Respecting the five Stages of Grief within Change Processes ...Respecting the five Stages of Grief within Change Processes …
http://changecom.wordpress.com/2012/10/10/the-five-stages-of-grief/

 Japan af

ter tsunami, Fukashima, fought through five stages of grief
The Saratogian, on Wed, 13 Mar 2013 13:57:11 -0700
The five stages of grief outlined in her 1969 book, “On Death and Dying,” aptly capture where the collective Japanese psyche has journeyed, and where it hasn’t, in the 24 months since a 9-magnitude quake and giant tsunami forever changed the

 

5 Stages of Grief Photo Essay5 Stages of Grief Photo Essay
Sarah Johnson, Colin Robertson, Keosha Scott.

 

7 STAGES OF GRIEF
http://www.recover-from-grief.com/7-stages-of-grief.html
The 7 stages of grief outlines a comprehensive working model. Learn what to expect and when things should improve.

 

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross
studies and the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying (1969), where she first discussed her theory of the five stages of grief

 

 

 

 

 

 

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